The G.Skill Ripjaws MX780 Gaming Mouse

G.Skill supplies the Ripjaws MX780 in a relatively simple cardboard box with modern artwork, focused on promoting the major features of the mouse. The top of the box can be opened to reveal more details and the mouse itself but the design of the packaging does not allow the potential buyer to test his/her grip.

 

Inside the box we found a small quick start guide, a couple of weights, a tool for the adjustment of the palm height and a set of side grips for left-handed users.

The Ripjaws MX780 sports a modern design, appearing to have its external plastic parts and electronics mounted on an aluminum frame. However, be warned that this is an elaborate illusion. As the specifications of this mouse clearly specify, only the base of the mouse is aluminum. The silver parts visible from the sides and top are plastic, although we have to admit these are so well designed and made that most people would find it difficult to tell the difference.

 

Including the basic left/right buttons and the wheel's middle button, there are eight buttons on the Ripjaws MX780, all of which are programmable. There are two buttons on each side of the mouse, as well as one button beneath the wheel. By default, the button beneath the wheel cycles between DPI settings. As for the side buttons, two are easily reachable with the thumb, but pressing the other two requires the use of the pinky finger and this can be very tricky. G.Skill had to go with this design as they made the MX780 ambidextrous, so they had to have two thumb-accessible side buttons in either case.

 

One of the most innovative features of the MX780 is that the side grips are removable and the second provided set reverses the mouse to a left hand design. Only magnets are used to secure the side grips so they can be easily removed by just pulling them off. Beneath each of the grips there is a cavity for one of the circular weights. There are only two 4.5 gr weights that, in our opinion, are nothing compared to the overall weight of the mouse (108 gr) and will not make a feelable difference for any kind of user.

 

Turning the mouse upside down reveals the aluminum plate that the Avago ADNS 9800 laser sensor is mounted on. This sensor is found on almost every high performance laser gaming mouse available today. A small hex screw can also be seen. Using the supplied tool, it is possible to adjust the height of the palm grip. This is not a very useful feature for those used to a claw grip, as the palm does not touch the mouse, but it can be convenient for those that are used to a palm grip. The thin skid feet of the MX780 are not too large but not small either and they provide very good performance.

 

There are several lighting areas on the MX780. One is the scrolling wheel, one is the logo at the front of the mouse, one is the mode selection lights and, finally, there are four wide LEDs installed across the area between the main buttons and the palm rest. These four wide LEDs by default serve as the DPI mode indicators. Their colors and various effects can be programmed via software but, in our opinion, these are of little importance on a mouse. Most of them are not even visible when someone's hand is on the mouse anyway.

  

The G.Skill Ripjaws KM780 Mechanical Keyboard The Unified Driver System Software
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  • Kutark - Thursday, November 12, 2015 - link

    He's an iSheeple. Pay no attention. Reply
  • fvbounty - Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - link

    They better check the Ducky Shine 5 RGB...for $165...Love my Ducky Legend great keyboard, and I've had the Corsair K95 which was nice! Reply
  • hulu - Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - link

    I believe centinewton should be abbraviated "cN", not "Cn". Centi (1/100) is "c" and Newton is "N". Reply
  • WithoutWeakness - Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - link

    This non-standard bottom row might be the worst one yet. The left CTRL, ALT, and Windows keys are all longer than the standard 1.25x width (they appear to be 1.5x, same as the Tab key). As a result, the spacebar winds up being 5.5x long instead of the standard 6.25x. The only keyboard I know of that uses a 5.5x spacebar is the Noppoo Chic Mini and replacement 5.5x spacebars are notoriously difficult to source (to the point that most people just 3D print a replacement)

    Non-standard layouts on otherwise standard keyboards make replacement key caps much more difficult to find. It both prevents users from customizing their keyboards how they want and makes the process of replacing worn, cracked, or broken keycaps more difficult. Given that this is an RGB keyboard that was designed and marketed with end-user customization in mind it makes no sense to stray from a standard layout just to make the left CTRL and ALT keys a few mm longer.
    Reply
  • Billy Tallis - Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - link

    I've never understood why people want a spacebar that's a mile wide. I much prefer Apple-like layouts where you can comfortably reach at least one modifier key with your thumb. Reply
  • BrokenCrayons - Wednesday, November 4, 2015 - link

    I find the name "Ripjaws" a little bit silly and painful sounding all at the same time. It conjures up disgustingly gory mental images of metal objects doing things inside someone's mouth that would result in an emergency room visit, follow-up surgery, and probably quite a lot of reconstructive dental work. I'd purchase any other competing product first just to avoid the branding if I were in the market. In fact, I have done just that with G.Skill's RAM offerings in the past. It makes me feel far too squirmy when I see the product name.

    The highly negative product branding connotations aside, I can't see either the keyboard or mouse providing an experience that's worth the price increase over a $20 in whatever keyboard and mouse combo pack costs the least from Amazon. I highly doubt that using these will grant a 10x improvement on typing in something or dragging and dropping a file over something significantly cheaper.
    Reply
  • marcplante - Thursday, November 5, 2015 - link

    Seems to me that most everyone is using the same switches (cherry), so it comes down to design and support if/when they fall. Reply
  • theuglyman0war - Friday, November 6, 2015 - link

    sure but design can entail a lot! Also as some have mentioned some might actually prefer the mech alternatives for ergonomics/actuation response but miss german build quality. What I hate is that I can not find one keyboard with all my design criteria... Romer keys sound nice if they actually have a brighter LED for my aging eyes and for us stereoscopic fans fuddling in the dark. Love the removable magnetic num pad design of of the MS sidewinder x6 but it is not mechanical. Keyboard designs usually seem to come in two flavors either unoriginal and conservative playing it safe... Or over the top tacky futuristic toy weapon. And when I do get a beautiful design like say Corsair's brushed aluminum jobs...
    The LED will be do dim. Or with other brands...
    They only offer one color of LED that doesn't match the $$$ I have invested in another color scheme. Or they do not offer my favorite switch ( blues ).
    Seems silly to say ( since preference is relative )
    But with all these mech offerings it seems strange that I can not find a stylistically beautiful design with a range of choices?
    Reply
  • theuglyman0war - Friday, November 6, 2015 - link

    case in point: LOGITECH
    plasticky designs to be certain but u get the sense that there is enough build quality there that such plastic keeps the price reasonable. Plus they do strike a nice balance in the looks dept. ( not a cookie cutter standard keyboard yawn and not way over the top )
    However, same old same old choice hopscotch... Yes they do have a version with mx blues ( hurray! ) but alas only white LEDs that stick out like a sore thumb with the rest of my color scheme ( although if u r going to lack a choice I suppose white is as neutral as Switzerland ).
    Spose I could try modding every key's LED ( and mod tuts for just about every keyboard for the the same issue confirms I am at least not alone )
    But LOGITECH is going to release an RGB version ( problem solved? I get to have my cake and eat it too??? )
    Nyet! Nope! UhUH!
    An over the top overly toyified design for Logitechs new flagship keyboard with ROHMER keys instead of the MX blues.
    Which is fine if that's what u wanted. Just seems that all that was needed was the an RGB addition to their mech line. ( all that is needed is a nice original design and a range of choices )
    Reply
  • nirvana11 - Saturday, November 7, 2015 - link

    This is one ugly looking phone. The pictures in this article are far better than the reality. Reply

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